TONAL RELATIVITY

VISUALIZATIONS and AUDIOLIZATIONS
of INTERVALS and MODES
INHERENT in a 12-TONE MUSICAL SYSTEM

COLORS + SHAPES = THE SPACE BETWEEN NOTES

 


tertiary color wheel

 


key to all intervals

KEY TO INTERVALS

 


 

modes of the major scale

MODES OF THE MAJOR SCALE

 

 



modes of the ascending melodic minor scale

MODES OF THE ASCENDING MELODIC MINOR SCALE

 

 

 

 

modes of the harmonic minor scale

MODES OF THE HARMONIC MINOR SCALE

 

 

 

pentatonic scale set 1

PENTATONIC SCALE SET 1

 

 

 

pentatonic scale set 2

PENTATONIC SCALE SET 2

 

overtone series

OVERTONE SERIES


 

modes of the major scale and modes of ascending melodic minro scale

MODES OF THE MAJOR SCALE and MODES OF THE ASCENDING MELODIC MINOR SCALE, monochrome

Click the images below to download them as PDFs:

modes of the major scale

 

 

TONOSCORES

Tonoscore Season Triptych
TONOSCORE 1: SEASON, triptych, acrylic on canvas, 20"x20", 2017

Tonoscores are musical compositions created using a technique based on the 12-color Tonal Relativity project (any 12 colors, shades, or textures can be used to represent the 12 tones in the scale...more shades can be added to represent additional pitches/microtones).

Using a clock face-like template (click the image below for high-res PDF), color is applied according to the sensibilities of the practitioner.

clock face tonoscore template

TONOSCORE 1: SEASON (shown above) consists of three parts. Starting at 12 o'clock, each part contains a sequence of all twelve colors before a color is repeated. Any color can correspond to any note, with all colors/notes being relative. Musicians can begin anywhere on the circle. One rotation can be thought of as equaling 60 seconds. (Please visit this link for more information / to hear an interpretation of SEASON)


 

AUDIOLIZATIONS

 

On April 29, 2017 a selection of works by Pauline Oliveros, LaMonte Young, Brian Harnetty, Mario Lavista, and Prepared Ear was performed the UNM ARTS Lab as a supplement to an exhibition of 2- and 3D works from the Tonal Relativity Series at Central Features Contemporary Art in Albuquerque, NM. The complete program and documentation from the evening can be found here.


~~~

Pauline Oliveros was a composer, accordionist, electronic music pioneer, and champion of Deep Listening. Her work has been deeply influential to Alyce Santoro and Julian Mock, the developers of the Tonal Relativity project.

"Listening as Activism: The Sonic Meditations of Pauline Oliveros" is a beautiful eulogy by Kerry O'Brien in the New Yorker, December 9, 2016.

Pauline reading the instructions for her Worldwide Tuning Meditation (excerpt "From the Kitchen Archives 1979"):

 

~~~

La Monte Young's Composition 1960 #7 offers players and listeners access into the universe of sound that emerges from two sustained notes a fifth apart (namely a B and an F#) played simultaneously. We invite musicians and non-musicians alike to try our version of it, Composition 2017 #1.

La Monte Young Composition 1960 #7

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Bill Evans' Twelve Tone Tune Two:

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Listen here to Alyce Santoro discussing an exhibition of the Tonal Relativity series at Eugene Binder on Marfa Public Radio on February 12, 2016.

For a treatise on sound's potential to shape atmosphere, please see Alyce Santoro's INTRODUCTION TO RHYTHMANALYSIS.

PLEASE INQUIRE for availablity of paintings or prints, individually or in sets.

~~~

 

“Improvisation is the art of becoming sound. It is the only art in which a human being can and must become the music he or she is making. It is the art of constant, attentive and dangerous living in every moment. It is the art of stepping outside of time, disappearing in it, becoming it. It is both the fine art of listening and responding and the more refined art of silence. It is the only musical art where the entire "score" is merely the self and the others, and the space and moment where and when this happens. Improvisation is the only musical art which is predicated entirely on human trust and love.”

– Alvin Curran, On Spontaneous Music, 1995

 

"The theory of relativity occurred to me by intuition, and music is the driving force behind this intuition. My parents had me study the violin from the time I was six. My new discovery is the result of musical perception."

– Albert Einstein to Shinichi Suzuki, Nurtured by Love: A New Approach to Education, 1969

 

“Musical innovation is full of danger to the State, for when modes of music change, the fundamental laws of the State always change with them.”

– Plato, The Republic

 

“Begin anywhere.”

– John Cage

 



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